Kevin Warnock

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ShoppinPal.com smart phone app from Fermyon, Inc. improves the brick and mortar retail shopping experience for both buyers and sellers

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Cofounders of ShoppingPal.com - Sriram Subramanian, CEO, and Pulkit Singhal, CTO. July 26, 2013. Photograph taken at University of California Berkeley Skydeck accelerator, on the top floor of the tallest building in Berkeley, California. That clock tower in the background is on the UC Berkeley campus. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Cofounders of ShoppinPal.com - Sriram Subramanian, CEO, and Pulkit Singhal, CTO. July 26, 2013. Photograph taken at University of California Berkeley Skydeck accelerator, on the top floor of the tallest building in Berkeley, California. That clock tower in the background is on the UC Berkeley campus. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Fermyon, Inc. is the company behind the impressive ShoppinPal smart phone application that improves the retail brick and mortar retail shopping experience for both buyers and sellers.

On Friday, July 26, 2013, I met with Sriram Subramanian, Chief Executive Officer, 34, and Pulkit Singhal, Chief Technical Officer, 29, the co-founders of Fermyon.

Retailers complain about people treating their physical stores as free showrooms for consumers to touch and evaluate items they will then actually buy online, frequently from giant Amazon. The retailer I suspect feels cheated by these people since they received something valuable, but didn’t make a purchase from the store to compensate the store for their efforts.

Consumers like mobile shopping apps like the one Amazon gives its customers. Smart phone shopping apps let people look up specifications and customer reviews to help them make smarter purchasing decisions. I don’t see shopping apps disappearing, since they offer such compelling value to consumers.

Retailers with physical stores could of course create their own smart phone applications that mimic those from huge online merchants, but it’s mostly larger chain stores that do, because writing a shopping application is difficult and costly.

That’s where ShoppinPal comes in.

ShoppinPal is a service that retailers pay money for — 3% of sales for retailers with over USD $5,000 in monthly ShoppinPal sales, or $49.00 + 3% of sales for retailers that sell less than $5,000 a month through ShoppinPal. This strikes me as assertive pricing, but if it works, Fermyon will be in a position arguably even better than Visa and Mastercard, because Fermyon is not taking any fraud or refusal to pay risk that I can see. On the other hand, no small retailer could hope to deploy a system like ShoppinPal by developing the system itself, and showrooming is a looming problem that likely is motivating retailers to take defensive action.

Shoppers use the service for free.

The retailer gets access to a custom branded application its customers can install on their own phones. In addition, the retailer gets access to an online management console that shows what customers are buying, among many other statistics. Since buyers provide their email address when they install the smart phone app, the store can easily send them custom messages.

ShoppinPal app display at Heartfelt gift store at 436 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco, California, USA, August 1, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

ShoppinPal app display at Heartfelt gift store at 436 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco, California, USA, August 1, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

For example, if a potential buyer uses the smart phone app to add several items to their ‘wish list’ the store will know about that and can gently remind the potential buyer to return to the store to buy the items. Buyers can be especially enticed to return by being sent discount codes that buyers can use to receive the items at a lower price. Buyers can even opt to have the items delivered to them, offering the convenience of online shopping to the offline world.

I like ShoppinPal. The small team of two co-founders and three staff have put together an offering that appears to come from a larger entity that has raised far more than the modest USD $120,000 in outside capital that Fermyon has taken in.

Buyer engagement potentially starts moments after walking through the door of a shop. One can ‘check in’ to the ShoppinPal app, like one ‘checks in’ on Facebook. The check in alerts store management that the buyer was present.

Next the customer can use the camera on their smart phone to scan the bar code on items they are interested in. The app recognizes the bar code and pulls up that product. The app can, at the option of the retailer, show customers recommendations for other items they may like in their store.

For new retailers, the ShoppinPal cloud based software taps into the retailers’ point of sale cash register system and reviews the receipts for the prior six months of sales. The software sees that people purchased certain items during the same transaction, and uses that set data to recommend that future purchasers also consider such grouped purchases.

CTO Singhal asked current retailers using their system to try the recommendation engine, and those queried marveled at how the recommendations matched with their memory of what many past customers had bought together.

The ShoppinPal app and the website are both beautiful – spare, elegant and clean. The management console is by Mixpanel, a separate company ShoppinPal pays to provide that service.

Sellers can add various incentives for shoppers to buy more items. For example, a discount can be applied after a certain number of purchases. Thus, a coffee shop could automate the ‘buy 10, get 1 free’ paper punch card that still is in use, and was in use at the tea shop where I met with Singhal and Subramanian.

That tea shop in fact allowed customers to store their paper cards in a physical file system on the counter out for the public to access. I marveled the tea shop would put such sensitive information out on public display, because a competitor could surreptitiously copy down a list of the shop’s best and most loyal customers. With quality video cameras in every smart phone, someone could just pretend they were looking for their card while capturing video of every card the thief perused. An electronic loyalty system like that included in ShoppinPal reduces the risk a customer list can fall into the hands of an outsider or an employee that should not have that information.

Inside ShoppinPal, there is not only a wish list, but a gift registry, which should encourage others to buy at a retailer the others may not even be aware of when the items are added to the registry.

ShoppinPal communicates via application programming interfaces to two point of sale cash register systems — Lightspeed Retail and Vend. ShoppinPal hands off to the cash register the precision task of calculating sales tax, sidestepping a thorny problem, since there are thousands of sales tax jurisdictions.

As a customer walks around a store, as they pick up items and place them in their physical shopping cart or basket, they can click ‘add to cart’ within the mobile app. This gives a running total of their planned purchases, and when the customer is ready to pay, they can buy directly from the app, which will display a receipt on screen the customer can show to store staff as they pass through the exit.

This pay within the app feature over time will let retailers hire fewer checkout clerks. The pay within the app feature can be turned off by the retailer that prefers customers visit a cash register to physically run their credit cards through a credit card terminal.

Whether the purchase is paid for in app or at a retailer’s register, the ShoppinPal management console keeps track of all the buyers’ purchases, and makes the purchase history available to the customer, which in my mind is a great perk for the customer. When I shop at Lowes and HomeDepot, I use their loyalty cards mostly because their systems email me a copy of my receipt within minutes after a purchase, which makes my life easier at income tax time.

The sexiest feature of the mobile app is a feature that adds fun to getting a discount. Instead of just writing out ‘you get a discount’ the app presents a silvery gray patch that looks just like the silvery patches covering the digits on lottery tickets. You have to ‘scratch off’ the patch with your finger, and as you rub the screen with your finger, the silvery ‘material’ under your finger vanishes. The effect was startlingly captivating such that I believe a tiny company could be formed just to advance this feature inside other unrelated products from other companies.

ShoppinPal is still an early stage venture. The company was incorporated in January, 2011, but work didn’t really accelerate until CEO Subramanian completed his MBA in June, 2012, last year.

Fermyon has signed up four customers, all via resellers that have agreed to carry their product. I view it as a positive sign that resellers are promoting their product while the company is still so young, for resellers have to be particularly careful to not damage their reputations.

Exterior of Heartfelt gift store at 436 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco, California, USA, August 1, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Exterior of Heartfelt gift store at 436 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco, California, USA, August 1, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

ShoppinPal’s customers are Harney & Sons in New York City, Heartfelt in San Francisco, Isha USA in Tennessee and Marthas Vineyard Glassworks in Massachussets, all in the United States. The Isha implementation is the most demanding, because the organization runs events that draw about 1,000 people twenty times or so per year, so the transaction volumes spike tremendously during events and subside the rest of the year.

Interior of Heartfelt gift store at 436 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco, California, USA, August 1, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Interior of Heartfelt gift store at 436 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco, California, USA, August 1, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

I live in San Francisco, so I decided to install the ShoppinPal app on my Apple iPhone 5 and visit Fermyon’s customer Heartfelt, a charming and totally adorable gift shop in the Bernal Heights neighborhood. This single store business doesn’t sell items that people are likely to evaluate and then order online from a giant website. But the Heartfelt is the kind of place that I think could benefit from the loyalty, gift registry and wish list features in ShoppinPal. The store also I suspect prides itself on having just the right gift, as there appear to be over 10,000 different items for sale inside this small store. As I was browsing around, I found half a dozen items I wanted to buy, and I am not even looking for gifts right now.

Jewelry for sale at Heartfelt gift store at 436 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco, California, USA, August 1, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Jewelry for sale at Heartfelt gift store at 436 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco, California, USA, August 1, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

As soon as you check in, a horizontal red line starts sweeping up and down the phone display. The indicates the phone is looking for a bar code to recognize. I created a video of the ShoppinPal experience from checking in to just before payment. I have embedded the video into this post. The video is a bit shaky because I had to hold my large camera in one hand, and operate the app with my other hand, and since the phone was so close, the depth of field was shallow. But the video does show faithfully what the app does.

As soon as the app finds a bar code, it goes into search mode where it’s communicating with the cash register computer to find the item. This takes about two to six seconds. Then the item shows up in your shopping cart. From there it is confusing what to do next, since there is no ‘checkout’ or ‘buy now’ button. Instead, to continue shopping, you are to press the button in the upper left labeled ‘heartfelt,’ the name of the store. This should be labeled ‘back’ or ‘continue shopping.’ There is a button in the upper right called ‘cart.’ I didn’t try that button, but I assume that button takes you to the shopping cart from where one can checkout.

Textiles for sale at Heartfelt gift store at 436 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco, California, USA, August 1, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Textiles for sale at Heartfelt gift store at 436 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco, California, USA, August 1, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

I scratched off the panel as invited, and I got a 10% discount. I was given the chance to pay via credit card or PayPal, the payment service from auction giant EBay. I bought a lightweight wallet made from Tyvek, and I paid via PayPal. The process was quick and efficient, but my receipt listed my discount as $0.00 even though the 10% discount had been correctly applied to the total. I understand that ShoppinPal was only recently installed at Heartfelt, so I expect there to be small glitches to be worked out. For such an early stage yet ambitious application, ShoppinPal performed well.

As you might imagine, ShoppinPal has big dreams and has had sales meetings with huge brands that are household names throughout the US. I suspect that after they build their credibility with smaller retailers for the following months that they will land a national retailer.

ShoppinPal participated in 2012 in the Silicon Valley Bank Seed Showcase, a pitch event to investors for Silicon Valley Bank clients. Silicon Valley Bank is widely considered one of the most important banks in Silicon Valley for startups that aspire to or have raised venture capital investment. You can watch CEO Subramanian pitch on stage and then watch him later that day be interviewed by Carrie Walsh, Managing Director II, ESG, Silicon Valley Bank.

I could find no direct competitors to Fermyon.

The closest offering appears to be CardFree, which automates via a smart phone app some of the tasks that ShoppinPal automates, like payment and loyalty. But CardFree omits the ability to scan the barcode of products to bring up specifications and Amazon.com like product recommendations, two of the most compelling features of ShoppinPal, in my mind.

Another company that does part of what ShoppinPal does is CardStar from Constant Contact. CardStar appears to be a smart phone app just for storing and using loyalty cards from multiple retailers, so your physical wallet doesn’t burst from storing too many physical cards, like mine is threatening to do.

Another loyalty card company is BellyCard, which appears to be similar to CardStar.

Finally, there is a smart phone payment app called AisleBuyer, which lets in store purchasers pay via their smart phone. This company was acquired by Intuit in 2012.

See what former CNET Editor at Large Rafe Neeleman had to say about ShoppinPal in 2012.

The company’s name Fermyon is a play on the particle physics term Fermion. The definition of the Fermion is better left to the article on Wikipedia I just referenced.

I took the picture of Subramanian and Singhal that accompanies this post with my Canon 5D Mark II camera, my Canon 50mm f:2.5 macro lens and my Paul C. Buff Einstein studio flash unit.

The location of the photograph is the Skydeck accelerator run by University of California Berkeley. Jeff Burton is the Executive Director of Skydeck, and Burton encourages me to write about the UC Berkeley affiliated companies that the accelerator houses in its exceptionally glorious 10,000+ square feet of penthouse office space. If you look out the window in the center of the picture, you will see the clock tower that serves as the focal point of the UC Berkeley campus. ShoppinPal is headquartered at Skydeck, but this is not an indicator that the team is reckless with its finances. To the contrary, it’s an indicator that the team is careful with its money since the company’s office space is provided for free by the University of California, from where Subramanian earned his Masters of Business Administration graduate degree. Skydeck gives free office space to only the companies it deems most likely to succeed.

I became aware of Subramanian over the last year because we both attend monthly Cal Founders meetings, which are designed to help founders and mentors be more successful in business. Subramanian and I are more acquaintances than friends since we’ve only met and spoken a handful of times. He learned of this blog and asked if I would write about his venture, and I agreed because I had become intrigued when he had introduced his company during the roundtable discussions at Cal Founders meetings. I disclose the circumstances of how we met to deflect any appearance of bias due to my already knowing Subramanian.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 – June 30, 2013

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San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 1

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 1

On Sunday, June 30, 2013, I attended the San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration in San Francisco, California USA.

The parade began near the foot of Market Street at 10:30am, and it continued for hours. I attended the first hour and a half of the parade with my dear friend Regina Aviles.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 2 - "Love Won" spelled with balloons

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 2 - "Love Won" spelled with balloons

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 3 - "Love Won" spelled with balloons

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 3 - "Love Won" spelled with balloons

After the parade, I walked up Market Street to Civic Center, where San Francisco City Hall is located. There were over 100,000 people there, I estimate. The weather was unusually warm and sunny for Summer in San Francisco. The mood was upbeat and vibrant.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 4 - man with balloons

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 4 - man with balloons

The mood was so bright because the United States Supreme Court on June 26, 2013 delivered astonishing news. Here is what Wikipedia has to say as of July 5, 2013:

On June 26, 2013, the Supreme Court of the United States issued its ruling on the appeal in the case Hollingsworth v. Perry, affirming that in accordance with numerous precedents, proponents of initiatives such as Proposition 8 did not possess legal standing in their own right to defend the resulting law in federal court, either to the Supreme Court or (previously) to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Therefore the Supreme Court both dismissed the appeal and directed the Ninth Circuit to vacate (withdraw) its decision, which had agreed with the district court ruling. The decision left the district court’s 2010 ruling as the final decision on Proposition 8.[8][9][10] On June 28, 2013, the Ninth Circuit lifted its stay of the district court’s ruling, enabling same-sex marriages to resume.[11]

The result is now the US Federal Government will recognize gay marriage for residents of US states where gay marriage is legal. Gay marriage is legal in California now, and gay couples have been getting married after June 26th.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 5 - trombone player with GoPro video camera attached to trombone to record parade

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 5 - trombone player with GoPro video camera attached to trombone to record parade

I was at City Hall the afternoon of July 5th, the day I wrote and posted this article. I was there to inquire about appealing the assessment of my home value, but I could not miss the many happy gay couples having their wedding photographs taken in the splendid halls of the restored building.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 6 - Woman capturing video of parade with an Apple iPad tablet computer

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 6 - Woman capturing video of parade with an Apple iPad tablet computer

I took over 3,000 pictures on Sunday at the parade and celebration, a record for one day in any context. My feet wore sore I did so much walking.

I now present 77 photographs from the event. I uploaded these at full size. Click on them twice in slow succession to see the full size versions. I used my Canon 5D Mark II DSLR camera, which captures images at approximately 21 megapixels. I used three different lenses throughout the day: Canon 80-200mm F:2.8 L zoom, Canon 16-35mm F:2.8 L zoom, Canon 50mm F:2.5 macro lens. I edited all of these pictures in Adobe Photoshop.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 7 - with United States Senator from California, Nancy Pelosi, in purple dress

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 7 - with United States Senator from California, Nancy Pelosi, in purple dress

There were hundreds of nude men and women at this event. Such nudity at festivals and parades conducted via the permission of official city permits is entirely legal in San Francisco. I do not show any actual nudity in the photographs that follow, but be warned that there are some topless women wearing nipple coverings. If you are offended by such images, please don’t view the rest of the pictures associated with this post.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 8, June 30, 2013, with Paul Katami and Jeff Zarrilo, one of the couples that challenged Proposition 8 before the United States Supreme Court, Photo by Kevin Warnock

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 8, June 30, 2013, with Paul Katami and Jeff Zarrilo, one of the couples that challenged Proposition 8 before the United States Supreme Court

There are images of famous politicians below, including United States Senator Nancy Pelosi.

The two couples that brought their cases to the US Supreme Court are also pictured. Paul Katami and Jeff Zarrilo are pictured immediately above, and Kris Perry and Sandy Stier are pictured immediately below.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 9, June 30, 2013, with Kris Perry and Sandy Stier Photo, one of the couples that challenged Proposition 8 before the United States Supreme Court, by Kevin Warnock

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 9, June 30, 2013, with Kris Perry and Sandy Stier Photo, one of the couples that challenged Proposition 8 before the United States Supreme Court

I almost got a picture of Facebook co-founder and current Chief Executive Office Mark Zuckerberg. According to news reports, he was riding on the motorized cable car bus you will see below. I believe I didn’t get a picture of him because I was not on the correct side of the street to see him. I have never seen Zuckerberg in person before, so I was and remain disappointed I missed him. Facebook is currently an important social network on the Internet. You may find me on that network at Facebook.com/kevinlwarnock and I invite you to subscribe to my public updates.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 10, June 30, 2013, Miss California Plus America, Photo by Kevin Warnock

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 10, June 30, 2013, Miss California Plus America

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 11, June 30, 2013, Families watching parade, Photo by Kevin Warnock

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 11, June 30, 2013, Families watching parade

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 12, June 30, 2013, newly engaged gay couple, Photo by Kevin Warnock

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 12, June 30, 2013, newly engaged gay couple

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 13, June 30, 2013, gay couple celebrating 47 years together, Photo by Kevin Warnock

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 13, June 30, 2013, gay couple celebrating 47 years together

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 14, June 30, 2013, Photo by Kevin Warnock

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 14, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 15, June 30, 2013, with Mark Leno (in white shirt), Photo by Kevin Warnock

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 15, June 30, 2013, with Mark Leno (in white shirt)

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 16, June 30, 2013, with Supreme Court justices, Photo by Kevin Warnock

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 16, June 30, 2013, with Supreme Court justices

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 17, June 30, 2013, antique cars in parade make their way up Market Street, away from the Ferry Building in the distance

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 17, June 30, 2013, antique cars in parade make their way up Market Street, away from the Ferry Building in the distance

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 18, June 30, 2013, Shelby Cobra car

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 18, June 30, 2013, Shelby Cobra car

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 19, June 30, 2013, female couple each dressed in a half a wedding dress and half a tuxedo

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 19, June 30, 2013, female couple each dressed in a half a wedding dress and half a tuxedo

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 20, June 30, 2013, Tom Ammiano

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 20, June 30, 2013, Tom Ammiano

 

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 21, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 21, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 22, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 22, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 23, L. Julius M. Turman, San Francisco Police Commissioner, riding in antique convertible Lincoln automobile

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 23, L. Julius M. Turman, San Francisco Police Commissioner, riding in antique convertible Lincoln automobile

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 24, June 30, 2013, with Hedwig and the Angry Itch

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 24, June 30, 2013, with Hedwig and the Angry Itch

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 25, June 30, 2013, San Francisco City Treasurer José Cisneros

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 25, June 30, 2013, San Francisco City Treasurer José Cisneros

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 26, June 30, 2013, Facebook company banner

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 26, June 30, 2013, Facebook company banner

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 27, June 30, 2013, Facebook employees on motorized cable car parade float

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 27, June 30, 2013, Facebook employees on motorized cable car parade float

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 28, June 30, 2013, Facebook employee wielding a real life Like stamp. Note she has a Like stamp on her cheek. I believe she was stamping willing strangers she encountered.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 28, June 30, 2013, Facebook employee wielding a real life Like stamp. Note she has a Like stamp on her cheek. I believe she was stamping willing strangers she encountered.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 29, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 29, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 30, June 30, 2013, looking up Market Street during lull in the arrival of parade floats

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 30, June 30, 2013, looking up Market Street during lull in the arrival of parade floats

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 31, June 30, 2013, winged man on stilts

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 31, June 30, 2013, winged man on stilts

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 32, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 32, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 33, June 30, 2013. Note that these subjects were actively posing for multiple photographers, and knew that they were being photographed.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 33, June 30, 2013. Note that these subjects were actively posing for multiple photographers, and knew that they were being photographed.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 34, June 30, 2013, winged men on stilts

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 34, June 30, 2013, winged men on stilts

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 35, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 35, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 36, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 36, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 37, June 30, 2013, sidewalk chalk artists

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 37, June 30, 2013, sidewalk chalk artists

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 38, June 30, 2013, man handing out pride brochures in front of City Hall

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 38, June 30, 2013, man handing out pride brochures in front of City Hall

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 39, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 39, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 40, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 40, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 41, June 30, 2013, woman with rainbow colored hair

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 41, June 30, 2013, woman with rainbow colored hair

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 42, June 30, 2013. It was unusually warm in San Francisco this day, and this person must have been sweltering in their black outfit.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 42, June 30, 2013. It was unusually warm in San Francisco this day, and this person must have been sweltering in their black outfit.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 43, June 30, 2013, City Hall

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 43, June 30, 2013, City Hall

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 44, June 30, 2013, City Hall from side

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 44, June 30, 2013, City Hall from side

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 45, June 30, 2013, woman dancing

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 45, June 30, 2013, woman dancing

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 46, June 30, 2013, women dancing on Federal Building ledge

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 46, June 30, 2013, women dancing on Federal Building ledge

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 47, June 30, 2013, dancing on Federal Building ledge

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 47, June 30, 2013, dancing on Federal Building ledge

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 48, June 30, 2013, dancing on Federal Building ledge

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 48, June 30, 2013, dancing on Federal Building ledge

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 49, June 30, 2013, woman with bow in hair

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 49, June 30, 2013, woman with bow in hair

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 50, June 30, 2013, woman dancing on Federal Building ledge

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 50, June 30, 2013, woman dancing on Federal Building ledge

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 51, June 30, 2013, beer bong being filled by woman riding piggyback

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 51, June 30, 2013, beer bong being filled by woman riding piggyback

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 52, June 30, 2013, women riding piggyback playing with rainbow flag

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 52, June 30, 2013, women riding piggyback playing with rainbow flag

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 53, June 30, 2013, women riding piggyback playing with rainbow flag

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 53, June 30, 2013, women riding piggyback playing with rainbow flag

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 54, June 30, 2013, women riding piggyback while dancing

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 54, June 30, 2013, women riding piggyback while dancing

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 55, June 30, 2013, Dylan, left, kissing Sarah in posed picture that subjects volunteered for. Note the man carrying the sign on the left. That man has been carrying a sign around the financial district for years and years. I remember him when I had my office on Montgomery Street. He's been covered in the newspaper before. I have never introduced myself to him.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 55, June 30, 2013, Dylan, left, kissing Sarah in posed picture that subjects volunteered for. Note the man carrying the sign on the left. That man has been carrying a sign around the financial district for years and years. I remember him when I had my office on Montgomery Street. He's been covered in the newspaper before. I have never introduced myself to him.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 56, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 56, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 57, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 57, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 58, June 30, 2013, red mohawk couple

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 58, June 30, 2013, red mohawk couple

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 59, June 30, 2013, woman dancing on stage in front of speakers

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 59, June 30, 2013, woman dancing on stage in front of speakers

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 60, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 60, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 61, June 30, 2013, woman dancing on stage in front of speaker columns

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 61, June 30, 2013, woman dancing on stage in front of speaker columns

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 62, June 30, 2013, woman in a Pink Floyd 'Dark Side of the Moon' t-shirt dancing on stage

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 62, June 30, 2013, woman in a Pink Floyd 'Dark Side of the Moon' t-shirt dancing on stage

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 63, June 30, 2013, couple dancing wild against the side of the Wild 94.9 FM van that was stationed near City Hall

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 63, June 30, 2013, couple dancing wild against the side of the Wild 94.9 FM van that was stationed near City Hall

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 64, June 30, 2013, woman Hula Hooping

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 64, June 30, 2013, woman Hula Hooping

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 65, June 30, 2013, woman with a Facebook 'Like' stamp on her arm. I believe a Facebook employee was going around stamping people with a rubber stamp inked with blue ink.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 65, June 30, 2013, woman with a Facebook 'Like' stamp on her arm. I believe a Facebook employee was going around stamping people with a rubber stamp inked with blue ink.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 66, June 30, 2013, woman with animal mask

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 66, June 30, 2013, woman with animal mask

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 67, June 30, 2013, pair making heart shapes with their hands

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 67, June 30, 2013, pair making heart shapes with their hands

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 68, June 30, 2013, man and woman dancing together

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 68, June 30, 2013, man and woman dancing together

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 69, June 30, 2013, feather mohawk

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 69, June 30, 2013, feather mohawk

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 70, June 30, 2013, woman dancing on ledge of Federal Building

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 70, June 30, 2013, woman dancing on ledge of Federal Building

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 71, June 30, 2013, man with red equality stamp on his face. This year numerous people temporarily replaced their Facebook Profile picture with an image of this equality stamp.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 71, June 30, 2013, man with red equality stamp on his face. This year numerous people temporarily replaced their Facebook Profile picture with an image of this equality stamp.

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 72, June 30, 2013, woman piggybacker

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 72, June 30, 2013, woman piggybacker

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 73, June 30, 2013, motorcyclist giving celebrants the high five as he drives very slowly through dance floor near City Hall

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 73, June 30, 2013, motorcyclist giving celebrants the high five as he drives very slowly through dance floor near City Hall

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 74, June 30, 2013, women posing for the camera

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 74, June 30, 2013, women posing for the camera

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 75, June 30, 2013. couple posing for the camera

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 75, June 30, 2013. couple posing for the camera

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 76, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 76, June 30, 2013

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 77, June 30, 2013, beautiful woman

San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration 2013 - picture 77, June 30, 2013, beautiful woman

I am sorry for the delay in posting this article, but it is a lot of work to go through 3,000 plus pictures and then edit and post the best 77 images.

Global Social Venture Competition final presentations on April 12, 2013 in Berkeley, California USA

without comments

Laura Tilghman, co chair of the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, introduces the competing teams, April 12, 2013.

Laura Tilghman, co chair of the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, introduces the teams, April 12, 2013

On Friday, April 12, 2013, I attended the 2013 final presentations by teams competing in the Global Social Venture Competition.

I was invited by Jennifer Walske, Faculty Director of the Global Social Venture Competition. Walske moderated the question and answer session between the judges and the competitors. I paid for a ticket to attend the event, but at a reduced rate as a member of the press — USD $49.50 rather than $99.00. Thank you to the organizers for the discount.

This event took place at the Haas School of Business on the campus of the University of California in Berkeley, California USA. Haas Dean Rich Lyons opened the event with some wise remarks.

Dean Rich Lyons, Molly Bode, Nick Cain and Laura Tilghman at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Dean Rich Lyons, Molly Bode, Nick Cain and Laura Tilghman at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

This event was an all day affair, with keynotes, panels and even a debate. I arrived at 8am and left around 8pm.

This competition is the premier social venture competition in the world, and, according to the organizers, close to 650 teams from 37 countries competed. My friend Sara Olsen co-founded the competition while she was getting her MBA at the University of California Berkeley.

Keynote speaker Josh Nesbit at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Keynote speaker Josh Nesbit at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

The morning keynote

Josh Nesbit, the CEO of Medic Mobile, gave one of the more uplifting keynotes I have heard in a while. I didn’t take notes so I am not prepared to summarize it, but he tells about a remarkable journey over the last four years or so where this non profit has improved the lives of tens of thousands of people in the developing world. The video of the talk should be posted to the Global Social Venture Competition website, or perhaps YouTube, by Friday, April 19, 2013, I’ve been told, so you’ll be able to watch it there. It’s well worth watching. I photographed Nesbit twice, and there is a more formal portrait of him at the bottom of this post.

The 6 final finalist teams

All 18 teams that traveled to Berkeley are finalists, and they all wore the same type of name badges. The 18 teams presented on Thursday, April 11, 2013, and the best 6 teams became what I will call the final finalists. In this post, I present short executive summaries of each of the 18 teams. This text was written by the teams themselves — I just copied it from the luxurious pamphlet distributed at the event. Normally, I place such text in quotes, but since this text compromises so much of this post, I am telling you here that the summaries are text I did not write.

The teams that advanced to the concluding round of judging are:

Faso Soap founders from the country Burkina Faso at  2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Faso Soap founders from the country Burkina Faso at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Faso Soap

1st place winner of USD $25,000; Blum Center for Developing Economies Peoples’ Choice Award of $1,500 — from the country Burkina Faso

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), about half of the world population is still at risk of contracting malaria. In 2010, among 219 million people affected, there were 660,000 deaths, of which 91% were in Africa where malaria remains the leading cause of death. Particularly vulnerable individuals are pregnant women, children under 5 and HIV patients. Considering this alarming report, Moctar Dembele and Gérard Niyondiko, two students from 2iE Foundation, have found an innovative solution through the project Faso Soap. The “soap of Faso” offers an innovative solution for the prevention of malaria, which takes into account financial constraints and cultural habits of African families. The company will produce and market both antibacterial and anti-mosquito soaps made with 100% local resources to integrate prevention against malaria in the daily lives of people most affected by this scourge. Faso Soap: “The action of a group, the future of an entire nation.”

Hannah Erickson and Eric Sorensen of Carbon Roots International at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Hannah Erickson and Eric Sorensen of Carbon Roots International at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Carbon Roots International

2nd place winner of USD $15,000 — Haiti

Carbon Roots International (CRI) started as an idea to explore the potential of carbon-rich char as a tool for international development. The idea evolved from a chain of emails between three friends, to meetings over lunch, to a trip to rural Haiti in 2010. Upon returning to the United States, CRI’s three co-founders established the organization to enable the adoption of char technologies in Haiti. CRI’s work served as the basis for co-founder Ryan Delaney’s Master’s thesis at Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability, and compelled another co-founder, Hannah Erickson, to pursue a graduate degree at the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources and Environment. After several years of refining technology and testing solutions, CRI has produced a feasible, scalable business plan that addresses two overlapping issues—charcoal fuel use and low agricultural productivity—which converge in Haiti, but are endemic throughout the developing world.

I guessed correctly that Carbon Roots would win 2nd place. I really like this company, which makes ‘green’ charcoal briquets out of agricultural waste, like sugar cane waste. The briquets look like small hockey pucks, and apparently burn as well as charcoal made from trees. Deforestation is a large problem, so Carbon Roots has the potential to help the planet on a meaningful scale.

Pulpworks, Inc., the third place winner at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Pulpworks, Inc., the third place winner at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Pulpworks, Inc.

3rd place winner of $7,500 — United States of America

PulpWorks: The planet is choking in garbage – toxic, enduring waste. And the single worst culprit is packaging – thirteen bathtubs full per year for each person on the planet; in the U.S. alone, 31 million tons of plastic waste was generated last year. PVC is the world’s leading toxic packaging material. Consumer packaged goods companies are seeking a cost-effective, sustainable replacement for their current unsustainable PVC packaging. To address this crisis, PulpWorks has created a compostable, all-pulp-and-paper alternative to toxic plastic (PVC) blister packaging. Our patent-pending package is, in essence, the “un-blister”. It showcases products in the same manner as traditional blister packs, but, rather than ending up in a landfill, the entire package can be composted after opening. Increasing consumer and regulatory pressure will eventually remove PVC from the marketplace. As designers and manufacturers of eco-friendly packaging, PulpWorks will reap the rewards of this marketplace shift.

This company has developed a way to turn paper pulp into appealing compostable packaging. The containers they showed me have a texture that is similar to cardboard egg cartons. The three presenters got a laugh out of the crowd when they said between the three of them they have 100 years of experience in business. I like this product, and I hope they succeed. Fortunately, the CEO, Paul Tasner, pictured above and individually below, has decades of experience in the packaging industry, and as a result, he has been able to get meetings with household name companies like Clorox.

The PulpWorks team traveled to the competition finals on Bart, the commuter train system in the San Francisco Bay Area, where the University of California is located.

Benjamin Cohen, Dori Pap and Travis Horsley at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013. Pap is a mentor for TOHL, Inc., one of the finalist teams, which is run by Cohen and Horsley.

Benjamin Cohen, Dori Pap and Travis Horsley at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013. Pap is a mentor for TOHL, Inc., one of the finalist teams, which is run by Cohen and Horsley.

Benjamin Cohen and Travis Horsley of TOHL, Inc - at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013. Photograph by Kevin Warnock.

Benjamin Cohen and Travis Horsley of TOHL, Inc - at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

TOHL, Inc.

Chile

TOHL developed a patent-pending technology for installing pipelines cheaply, quickly sustainably, and in any location. This technology utilizes much longer segments of pipeline than what is traditionally used. Single segments of pipeline are manufactured in lengths of 500 meters to several kilometers, and these long segments are loaded directly onto large spools that are deployed via helicopter or truck. The pipelines have fewer connections, which decreases labor hours during installation and allows the pipelines to be in operation faster than is possible if using conventional infrastructure technology. The patent-pending helicopter installations method also allows for TOHL to access remote areas that previously could not be reached, which is significant, because valuable water sources are often inaccessible. Lastly, TOHL’s technology also offers the service of pipeline removal and re-use, when the pipeline is only needed for temporary applications. The tubing is re-spooled and recycled for other projects saving money and resources.

This is the team I thought would win 1st place. Drinking dirty water either kills or makes ill countless numbers of people. This company can install a flexible water hose by flying a helicopter from a source of clean water to where water is needed. Often, their services are needed after a natural disaster like an earthquake. It could take months to repair a permanent underground pipe that serves an area damaged in a quake. TOHL can install a pipe overground in minutes once everything’s set up. The technology is not new, as I learned the oil exploration industry has been using the technique for years to bring water to their drilling rigs that are often out of reach of conventional plumbing. What’s new with TOHL is their specialization on emergency installations. They have developed expertise working with local governments to get the necessary permits and easements, a process I suspect is so difficult that it will discourage cheap copycats from competing with their company. The company’s first efforts have been in Chile, most likely because they received startup financing and support as part of the well known Startup Chile program.

The TOHL team is operating with real paying customers. The team showed an impressive video where their rented helicopter drops down tubing from a giant spool that hangs below the aircraft like a water container on a fire fighting helicopter. The TOHL helicopter showed tubing can be set down even on the tops of trees — flat or smooth ground is not required.

If the tubing is made unnecessary after some months, perhaps by the broken underground pipes being restored, the tubing can be reeled back onto the spool for reuse elsewhere.

Amazingly, the tubing can handle being outside for 25 years.

Founders Benjamin Cohen and Travis Horsley were impressive, and I spent perhaps half an hour hearing about their exciting venture. I wish them well.

The TOHL team studied at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), one of the 9 partner schools that together stage the Global Social Venture Competition. Each school sends a representative that works for the institution to the global finals. Georgia Tech sent Dori Pap, the Assistant Director of the Institute for Leadership and Entrepreneurship, pictured above with the TOHL team.

Reel Gardening team from South Africa at  2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Reel Gardening team from South Africa at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Reel Gardening

Reel Gardening is a manufacturing company that aims to make gardening simple. Its main product is a biodegradable strip that encases organic fertilizer and open pollinated seed at the correct depth in the soil, and the correct distance apart. Reel Gardening indicates where each plant will sprout allowing for watering to be localized, enabling a saving of 80% water in the germination phase. The strip also helps restore soil fertility as the paper breaks down and the vegetable based inks and organic fertilizer seep into the soil. The Reel Gardening team is made up of Claire Reid (Inventor and Founder), Sean Blanckenberg (Director at Reel Gardening), Emily Jones (Project Manager at Reel Gardening), Greg Macfarlane (Financial Advisor) and Dianna Moore (Business Advisor).

CSA Munching Box finalist team at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

CSA Munching Box finalist team at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013. Left to right: Kongkrai Maksrivorawan, Sanjay Popli, Lalana Srikam and Niteepong Techamontrikul. Team member Bryan Hugill not shown as his visa didn't arrive in time for him to attend the event.

CSA Munching Box

CSA Munching Box is a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program providing weekly subscription-based delivery of seasonal, organic fresh fruit and vegetables direct from the farms to customers’ doorsteps and bringing the customers closer to our farmer networks in rural areas. We also serve as a distribution platform linking artisanal food producers to the urban market. Additionally, CSA Munching Box brings positive social impacts to its partners. We also use packaging made from recycled materials as well as deliver our products via bicycle couriers to reduce carbon footprint. The primary target customer group is the health-conscious and discerning consumers in major cities across Thailand. This group tends to have more knowledge about CSA, appreciates the concept, and possesses higher purchasing power.

The 12 finalist teams

Eighteen teams traveled to Berkeley for the final two rounds of the competition. On Thursday, April 11, 2013, six teams advanced to the concluding round of judging. The twelve teams that did not advance each got to deliver their pitch to all the attendees. The 12 finalists are:

AtRuim finalist team at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

AtRuim finalist team at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Sangjae Park and Sung Jun of AtRium from South Korea at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Sangjae Park and Sung Jun of AtRium from South Korea at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

AtRium

South Korea

The low income families in the world’s cold regions suffer not only from cold weather but also from problems such as fuel costs, illness, and pollution due to their outdated, inefficient stove heating system. AtRium addresses these socio-economic and environmental issues through an affordable heat absorber, G-saver, which is developed based on appropriate technology. Our primary target is Mongolian households living in a “Ger.” Later we will expand to other cold regions such as Inner Mongolia and Kazakhstan, and also to developed countries with our technology. Built on a consortium among Good Neighbors (NGO), Good Sharing (Social Venture), and Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Academia), we aim to contribute to building a sustainable ecosystem that balances economic and social values by pursuing sustainable profit generation, improving the quality of life of low income families, protecting the environment, and developing local economy in cold regions.

Pasquale Fedele and Jarrod Fath of BrainControl, from Italy, at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Pasquale Fedele and Jarrod Fath of BrainControl, from Italy, at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Jarrod Fath and Pasquale Fedele of BrainControl from Italy - at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Jarrod Fath and Pasquale Fedele of BrainControl from Italy - at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

BrainControl

Italy

BrainControl is a breakthrough technology that gives disabled people the power to control objects with their minds, allowing them to control a communicator, domotic devices (lights, doors, windows, alarms, temperature, bed position, etc.), wheelchairs, and other assistive technologies. Based on a proprietary Brain-Computer Interfaces technology (BCI), BrainControl interprets the electric map that correspond to certain brain activity and allows patients to control a tablet PC through specific thoughts, overcoming physical disability, and improving communication and environmental control. The focus is on assistive applications for people affected by degenerative neuromuscular disease (multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – ALS) and ischemic or traumatic injury, which each year affects more than 3 million patients. BrainControl is the world’s first assistive technology that is usable by people who cannot move any muscles or communicate, but who are consciously aware, a state called “locked-in” or “apparent coma”.

Jackie Stenson of Essmart Global from USA and India - at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Jackie Stenson of Essmart Global from USA and India - at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Essmart Global

United States of America / India

Essmart: Millions of people have unmet essential needs, such as clean water and safe, reliable lighting. Hundreds of essential technologies that meet these needs already exist, such as non-electric water filters and affordable off-grid solar lanterns. However, these technologies are not reaching the people they were designed to benefit. Essmart builds an essential marketplace for these products in places where people already shop – their local retail shops – so that everyone can access them.

Botao Liang of E-Lamp from China - at  2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Botao Liang of E-Lamp from China - at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

E-Lamp

China

E-Lamp is an intelligent lighting control system. It can adjust the color and brightness level of the LED light source by remote control using a mobile device. It can be used in agriculture: as the population of the world continues to grow, more food and crops are needed. As plants at different growth stages require specific spectral and wavelength, production could be sped up using E-Lamp’s adjustment of light intensity and spectral wavelength. The mobile device remote control can be used in agricultural greenhouses to centralize control of E-Lamp equipment in a single region or multiple regions to make the management more convenient. E-Lamp also can be used to improve disabled people’s daily life, allowing them to easily control the light and adjust the color to match their mood, even for psychological treatment.

Venkateswara Rao of Damascus Fortune from India at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Venkateswara Rao of Damascus Fortune from India at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Damascus Fortune

India

We at Damascus Fortune not only clean the planet, but have made the whole carbon conversion process profitable. We sequester carbon from carbon emitting industries and convert it into one of the strongest materials known to man – carbon nanotubes, carbon fibers and carbon nanorods. Our products are ultra-low cost as we use the waste emission and heat from the industry itself. We wish to start a composite manufacturing plant from in-house manufactured carbon structures to cater to automobile, aircraft, construction and other industries. We are seeking support to scale into new markets globally.

Armel Guenguara, left, founder of Nafa Naana, at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Armel Guenguara, left, founder of Nafa Naana, at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Nafa Naana

Burkina Faso

In Burkina Faso, households still rely on firewood for 90% of their energy consumption, thus contributing to irreversibly damaging their forest ecosystems. Toxic fumes from burning wood are harmful for people and issues faced in supplying fuel (for cooking and lighting) are a precariousness factor, particularly for women. Solutions do exist but remain out of reach for the most vulnerable populations.  Nafa Naana – which means “gains made easy” in local language – mission is to make clean and affordable energy products (energy-efficient stove, gas stove, solar lamps…) available to even the poorest households. The distribution channels are based on retailers operating as social microfranchisees and on direct sales to women’s groups. Financial barriers – for end-users, retailers and producers – are removed through the use of microcredit and savings mechanisms.

Meme B. Ortis, co-founder of Jorsey Ashbel Farms, delivering his Peoples' Choice winning pitch, at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Meme B. Ortis, co-founder of Jorsey Ashbel Farms, delivering his Peoples' Choice winning pitch, at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Jorsey Ashbel Farms

Center for Responsible Business Quick Pitch Award of USD $1,000 — Nigeria

Jorsey Ashbel Farms (JAF) is an unconventional livestock farm pioneering a groundbreaking approach to tackling the poverty problem of Protein-Energy Malnutrition, which affects millions of disadvantaged children and women. JAF produces Nigeria’s cheapest livestock products using an innovative, scientifically proven, low-cost livestock feed production technique combined with an innovative deployment strategy.

Meme B. Ortis in my mind really deserved this award. He was the most intense and passionate of all the 18 speakers. You can see his energy in the picture of him just above. He was constantly using his hands to make his point, and his voice was powerful and resonant. I was so happy I got to meet Ortis to photograph him.

We had a great conversation about those pesky emails everyone receives asking for help moving millions of dollars for a percentage. He said he has several of them in his email box right now. I shared with him the story of a guy that turned the tables on the spammers by getting them to write out in longhand one of the Harry Potter books. He had not heard about that reverse scam. If you haven’t heard about it either, I promise you’ll enjoy the story.

Here’s the summary: a guy gets a scam email and replies he’s too busy to help because he’s busy providing handwriting samples at $100 a page to improve a company’s handwriting recognition software. Soon, the scammer is asking to join in providing samples, and he ends up writing out with a pen the text of a 293 page novel, hoping to collect tens of thousands of dollars. Of course, he never is paid for his work, which is retribution for him scamming others out of their money via his emails.

From the summary written by the team, you wouldn’t guess what they really do, which is fascinating.

There is protein rich food inside a mango seed. The company opens the seeds, which apparently are not costly and are plentiful, and extracts the presumably mushy contents. That contents are so acidic it will kill chickens that eat it directly, but Jorsey Ashbel Farms has developed a method to process the extract so that chickens can safely and productively eat it. Even though this sounds like a lot of trouble, I learned there is a big cost savings versus feeding chickens corn. JAF runs a farm where they grow mangos and raise 10,000 chickens, in harmony. I would love to visit their operation to see this wonderful sounding operation first hand.

I forgot to tell the founders that I raise four chickens for eggs in my backyard in San Francisco. My chickens eat chicken feed from a bag, not mangos, however.

Ortis’ co-founder Ashbel Ayuba, pictured in the portrait section below, was the most stylishly dressed of the competitors, and had on a pair of highly polished green leather shoes made from the hide of an animal I could not identify. They looked like something rock star Prince would wear. In the early 1990s I saw Prince hanging out as a regular customer in the trendy nightclub Les Bains in Paris, France, and he had on some similarly wild boots, which matched his pants, which matched his coat with tails. He carried a golden walking stick, and had beefy bodyguards on either side, but nobody paid him any attention, as I don’t think he was famous yet in Paris. I told my French friends the next morning that I had seen Prince, and not one of them knew of him. I was ten feet from Prince dancing for an hour, so I am 100% certain it was Prince.

I stopped Ayuba on the stairs and asked to photograph him before I even knew what company he was part of — I just love his look and attitude. I told him he looked like what I would imagine an African James Bond would look like. He enthusiastically pumped his fist in the air and said ‘YEAH!!!’

I love being a photographer.

Woof founder from Hong Kong at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Woof founder from Hong Kong at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12 2013

WOOF

Hong Kong

WOOF is a premium fashion brand producing elegant, yet quirky and fun fashion accessories. What makes us different is that our line of goods is produced by Chiengora (dog hair). WOOF’s raw material is collected from various grooming stores and animal welfare organizations. The grooming division of our current NGO partner, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA), provides over 60% of the dog hair raw material for WOOF production. WOOF ensures that all our sources of material are 100% animal-friendly. WOOF production is a technology innovation. We are currently co-developing the machine spinning technology with our academic partner, the Institute of Textile and Clothing (ITC) from the Poly University of Hong Kong. Through fashion, WOOF aims to change attitudes towards animals. We aim to do this through two means: 1) reducing animal surrenders and increasing animal adoptions, and 2) improving the living conditions of animals.

Wedu founder from Thailand at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Wedu founder from Thailand at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Wedu

Thailand

Wedu catalyzes the next generation of local female leaders by providing innovative financing options for university and the lifelong support of mentors. We create a sustainable and positive cycle of development by identifying girls committed to local issues; investing in their education; mentoring them to lead and creating incentives for them to repay the funds to serve more girls. We envision a world where people from the most underprivileged backgrounds have the tools to change their lives and their home country by being masters of their own development. We started operations in Cambodia and Myanmar, built partnerships from the U.S. to Japan, united a league of extraordinary advisers and mentors from the Acumen Fund, Husk Power Systems, Unreasonable Institute and beyond. Wedu is Social Enterprise Startup of 2012 at Cambridge University, GSVC-SEA Winner, Semi-Finalist for the Echoing Green Fellowship and in the Top 10 Global Solution Award at Women Deliver 2013.

Vi-Care founder, from India, at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Vi-Care founder, from India, at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Vi-Care

India

Vi-Care is a one-of-a-kind company in India, and is on its way to formation to provide a low cost solution to address the problem of high infant mortality due to pneumonia in rural India. Vi-Care focuses on implementing a cost effective solution for the timely detection of pneumonia in infants, keeping in mind the lack of healthcare infrastructure in rural areas. Vi-Care’s solution involves the use of ubiquitous mobile phones to detect pneumonia in infants. Vi-Care provides a unique diagnostic application (i-Treat) capable of performing preliminary but informative diagnosis of pneumonia without requiring any external infrastructure or expert intervention, thereby greatly improving the chances of survival of infants in rural areas. The value proposition of Vi-Care rests upon providing an unrivaled, cost-effective approach to timely detect pneumonia in low-income, rural areas, keeping in mind the financial constraints of the people.

Sunshine Library Rural Digital Education Initiative team at  2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Sunshine Library Rural Digital Education Initiative team at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Sunshine Library

China

Sunshine Library Rural Digital Education Initiative (Sunshine Library) is a social venture seeking to improve rural education in China via modern technology. We aim to provide a comprehensive education solution to under-resourced, rural schools using specially designed tablet PCs. Sunshine Library does not only provide tablet PCs for under-resourced schools, nor do we place our volunteer teachers in rural schools. Leveraging information technology, we provide an integrated solution with a sustainable model of operation. We designed a tablet PC, the Sunbook, and educational apps customized to the needs of students, teachers, and schools in rural setting. Then, we deliver the tablets with Internet access to rural students, new teaching methods to teachers, and extensive educational resources to schools, hoping to eliminate education inequity. Now, we have provided 2,000 tablets for students and teachers in 4 rural schools in western China.

Lorenzo Di Ciaccio and Alessandro Gaeta of Pedius from Italy at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Lorenzo Di Ciaccio and Alessandro Gaeta of Pedius from Italy at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Pedius

Italy

Pedius is a communication system helping deaf people to make normal phone calls, using voice recognition technologies and speech synthesis. Pedius’ users can call all emergency numbers for free, as well as all partner companies supporting our accessibility program who agree to pay a fee and provide users a toll free access number. Users can also call private numbers, paying an affordable fee comparable to what is offered by VoIP communication providers. The goal of Pedius is the reduction of communication barriers for deaf people, enabling phone services for all and at the same time increasing the visibility of our accessibility partner companies.

I like this company. It turns out the founders know my friend Dan Luis, who used to be CEO for years at Purple, the company that bought my first Internet startup Hotpaper.com, Inc. Purple is in roughly the same business as Pedius, but Purple uses people to bridge connections between parties, while Pedius uses software.

The panels and debates

As I mentioned above, this event filled a day. There were panels and debates on social entrepreneurship. I stepped in briefly to take some pictures, but sadly, I did not have time to watch the events, with the exception of the morning keynote. I was busy either photographing or rounding up the subjects nearly all day.

Agricultural solutions for addressing poverty workshop at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013, held at University of California, Berkeley

Agricultural solutions for addressing poverty workshop at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013, held at University of California, Berkeley

Social enterprises in the developing world panel at 2013 Global Social Venture Competitiion, April 12, 2013, Anderson Auditorium, Haas School of Business, University of California Berkeley

Social enterprises in the developing world panel at 2013 Global Social Venture Competitiion, April 12, 2013, Anderson Auditorium, Haas School of Business, University of California Berkeley

Individual portraits

I took all the pictures that illustrate this blog post. I like very much to photograph people, and entrepreneurs are among my favorite subjects. I asked all of the subjects you see here for permission to photograph them, with the exception of the shot with Dean Rich Lyons, which I captured by standing alongside the official paid photographer, my longtime friend Bruce Cook. He set that shot up, and I simply asked the subjects to look at my camera after Cook was done getting his shots.

I took individual photographs of some of the founders, and I present those images to conclude this post. I gave permission to the subjects for them to use the pictures, so I hope to see these images on their websites and elsewhere around the web. Thank you to all the subjects for being so patient with me to get these results.

Sung Jun, CEO of AtRium from South Korea, at the Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Sung Jun, CEO of AtRium from South Korea, at the Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Paul Tasner, CEO of Pulpworks, Inc. at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Paul Tasner, CEO of Pulpworks, Inc. at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Elena Olivari, Vice President of Research and Development at Pulpworks, Inc. at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Elena Olivari, Vice President of Research and Development at Pulpworks, Inc. at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Travis Horsley of TOHL, Inc. at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Travis Horsley of TOHL, Inc. at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Ashbel Ayuba, co-founder of Jorsey Ashbel Farms, at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Ashbel Ayuba, co-founder of Jorsey Ashbel Farms, at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Lalana Srikam, CEO of finalist team CSA Munching Box from Thailand, at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition,  April 12, 2013

Lalana Srikam, CEO of finalist team CSA Munching Box from Thailand, at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Meme B. Ortis (Note: his name may be Blessing Oritseweyinmi as that's what his nametag said. But I had him write his name for me, and he wrote Meme B. Ortis, so I don't know which is correct) the co-founder of Jorsey Ashbel Farms at  2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Meme B. Ortis (Note: his name may be Blessing Oritseweyinmi as that's what his nametag said. But I had him write his name for me, and he wrote Meme B. Ortis, so I don't know which is correct) the co-founder of Jorsey Ashbel Farms at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Lorenzo Di Ciaccio the CEO of Pedius at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Lorenzo Di Ciaccio the CEO of Pedius at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Eric Sorensen, Executive Director of Carbon Roots International, at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Eric Sorensen, Executive Director of Carbon Roots International, at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Claire Catherine Reid, Managing Director of Reel Gardening from South Africa, at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Claire Catherine Reid, Managing Director of Reel Gardening from South Africa, at Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Pasquale Fedele, CEO of BrainControl, at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013. Photographed at International House near the UC Berkeley campus.

Pasquale Fedele, CEO of BrainControl, at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013. Photographed at International House near the UC Berkeley campus.

Benjamin Cohen, CEO of TOHL, Inc., at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Benjamin Cohen, CEO of TOHL, Inc., at the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013

Portrait of keynote speaker Josh Nesbit at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013, University of California Berkeley

Portrait of keynote speaker Josh Nesbit at 2013 Global Social Venture Competition, April 12, 2013, University of California Berkeley

I used my Canon 5D Mark II camera to take these pictures. The group shots were taken with a Canon 50mm macro lens. The individual shots were taken with a Canon 80-200mm f:2.8 L zoom lens. The wide shots were taken with a Canon 16-35mm f:2.8 L zoom lens. I upload pictures to this blog at camera resolution of 21 megapixels. Click on the pictures to load the full size versions, which are larger than the versions you see by default. I pursue blogging and photography as a hobby.

I am sorry I could not photograph everyone. I would have liked to photograph all 18 teams properly, like I do when I attend the 500 Startups Demo Days.

I really enjoyed this event. It was exciting to meet people from around the world. I invite everyone I met, if allowed in your country, to friend me on Facebook so we may stay in touch. Thanks and good luck!

The final day at The Exploratorium science museum at The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco, California – January 2, 2013

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Palace of Fine Arts about an hour before sunset on January 2, 2013, the final day of operation of The Exploratorium science museum at that location.

Palace of Fine Arts about an hour before sunset on January 2, 2013, the final day of operation of The Exploratorium science museum at that location.

Earlier today I took an emotional trip down memory lane by photographing the world famous Exploratorium science museum during its final hour at its building at The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco, California USA. On Friday, April 12, 2013, the Exploratorium opens at its new location at Pier 15, on the historic waterfront north of Market Street and near the Ferry Building in San Francisco. Pier 15 is served by historic restored street cars that stop in front, so I predict that many more people will visit, since the original location is rather difficult to access, and parking in particular is a nightmare.

Bell ringers smile as they celebrate the start of a new chapter for the Exploratorium, January 2, 2013

Bell ringers smile as they celebrate the start of a new chapter for the Exploratorium, January 2, 2013

If invited by the Exploratorium staff, for example after they discover this post, I will cover the opening event on this blog, and I will photograph it with the same quality technique I used for the photographs that accompany this post. If not invited, I will wait for a free admission day to visit.

I used my Canon 5D Mark II camera for these pictures. I uploaded the pictures at full camera resolution of 21 megapixels. Click on them to see them at full size. I used a tripod for many of the shots, and since it’s so dark inside the Exploratorium, many of the pictures were made with time exposures of up to 8 seconds. That accounts for the blurred people in some of the shots. I like that the blurring suggests lots of busy activity at the museum, which is definitely true. The tripod shots were taken at ISO 100, so the image quality is outstanding. The handheld shots were taken at ISO settings as high as 6,400, and the quality suffers. I should have brought a flash so that I could have taken more photographs of visitors experiencing the exhibits.

I love and admire The Exploratorium museum above all others. The Exploratorium teaches visitors about the world we all live in, and it does it in such an engaging and fun way that visitors keep coming back, over decades. The exterior wall of the large gift shop was covered with sweet notes from visitors, and these note cards were grouped by decade. Even the 1970s section had over 100 cards on it.

The Exploratorium opened in 1969.

The Exploratorium has exhibits that seed the imagination, so this museum helps human kind progress. I think The Exploratorium is more effective at seeding the imagination than even the traditional great museums of the world such as The Louvre.

I almost missed this special day, and had it not been for the website Funcheap San Francisco which lists free or inexpensive ways to have fun in my favorite city. I subscribe to the site’s Facebook page, and a status update to that page alerted me to the final day I am covering here.

Here below is a sequence of photographs that give you a tour of this large museum space, starting and the front, then moving to the upper deck level, and finally showing the back of the museum from the deck.

View from shortly past the front entrance to the Palace of Fine Arts Exploratorium, January 2, 2013, minutes before closing time.

View from shortly past the front entrance to the Palace of Fine Arts Exploratorium, January 2, 2013, minutes before closing time.

The workshop where the exhibits are built, January 2, 2013. Note that it appears to me that many of the big shop tools have already been removed.

The workshop where the exhibits are built, January 2, 2013. Note that it appears to me that many of the big shop tools have already been removed.

The Exploratorium at The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco on its final day - picture 9, January 2, 2013. Photograph by Kevin Warnock.

The upper deck that overlooks the workshop area at the Palace of Fine Arts Exploratorium, January 2, 2013.

Looking toward the front entrance to the Exploratorium during the final hour of operation at The Palace of Fine Arts, January 2, 2013. Look at the echo chamber pipe in the upper right of the frame.

Looking toward the front entrance to the Exploratorium during the final hour of operation at The Palace of Fine Arts, January 2, 2013. Look at the echo chamber pipe in the upper right of the frame.

A 6 second long exposure of the upper deck at The Exploratorium on its final day at The Palace of Fine Arts, January 2, 2013

A 6 second long exposure of the upper deck at The Exploratorium on its final day at The Palace of Fine Arts, January 2, 2013

A view from the upper deck of gift shop at The Exploratorium, January 2, 2013

A view from the upper deck of gift shop at The Exploratorium, January 2, 2013

A side view from the upper deck looking toward the back of The Exploratorium on January 2, 2013

A side view from the upper deck looking toward the back of The Exploratorium on January 2, 2013

From the upper deck looking toward the back of The Exploratorium at The Palace of Fine Arts, January 2, 2013. Notice how most of the illumination is from the enormous skylights. It's always been dark inside, even when I was in high school. It's a good thing I brought my tripod to allow long time exposures.

From the upper deck looking toward the back of The Exploratorium at The Palace of Fine Arts, January 2, 2013. Notice how most of the illumination is from the enormous skylights. It's always been dark inside, even when I was in high school. It's a good thing I brought my tripod to allow long time exposures.

Now I will show you some of the exhibits. Note that no admission was charged today, so there were more visitors than normal. I only had one hour to take still pictures and video, so I was rushed.

The Exploratorium at The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco on its final day - picture 10, January 2, 2013

The weight at the end of the pole is balanced on a computer controlled screw drive

The Exploratorium at The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco on its final day - picture 11, January 2, 2013

A spinning exhibit with mirrors and toy action figures. When spun, a viewer looking into the mirrors sees an animation of all the figures.

The round disk in the table surface is rotating. Visitors try to place metal wheels onto the surface of the quickly rotating disk. If successful, the wheels roll mostly in place relative to the visitor. I remember this exhibit from my childhood.

The round disk in the table surface is rotating. Visitors try to place metal wheels onto the surface of the quickly rotating disk. If successful, the wheels roll mostly in place relative to the visitor. I remember this exhibit from my childhood.

Large parabolic shaped mirror demonstrates that light and heat can be focussed to a point. Note electric space heater pictured in the center of the mirror.

Large parabolic shaped mirror demonstrates that light and heat can be focused to a point. Note electric space heater pictured in the center of the mirror.

Colorful exhibit at The Exploratorium, January 2, 2013. Sadly, I was so rushed that I didn't learn what is being taught here.

Colorful exhibit at The Exploratorium, January 2, 2013. Sadly, I was so rushed that I didn't learn what is being taught here.

I remember this exhibit from when I was in high school. From a specific vantage point to the right, this looks like a solid triangle of wood. From this angle, it's quite a different shape. Memorable.

I remember this exhibit from when I was in high school. From a specific vantage point to the right, this looks like a solid triangle of wood. From this angle, it's quite a different shape. Memorable.

I remember this water vortex exhibit from when I was in high school. This plastic cylinder is about a meter across and 2 meters tall... impressive.

I remember this water vortex exhibit from when I was in high school. This plastic cylinder is about a meter across and 2 meters tall... impressive.

Large mechanical clock powered by energy stored in lifted concrete weights. This shot was taken at 4:35pm, 25 minutes before the Palace of Fine Arts Exploratorium closed forever on January 2, 2013.

Large mechanical clock powered by energy stored in lifted concrete weights. This shot was taken at 4:35pm, 25 minutes before the Palace of Fine Arts Exploratorium closed forever on January 2, 2013.

A child clapping into a long echo chamber tube, and listening to hear the sound of his clapping race to the end of the tube and back

A child clapping into a long echo chamber tube, and listening to hear the sound of his clapping race to the end of the tube and back

A model of an animal cell at The Exploratorium science museum at The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco, California USA, January 2, 2013

A model of an animal cell at The Exploratorium science museum at The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco, California USA, January 2, 2013

As I was leaving, I picked up a free poster advertising the new location for the museum, which will be Pier 15 on the San Francisco waterfront, downtown, near the Ferry Building.

Staff members handing out free promotional posters for the new Exploratorium that will open later this year near the Ferry Building in downtown San Francisco. Picture taken January 2, 2013.

Staff members handing out free promotional posters for the new Exploratorium that will open later this year near the Ferry Building in downtown San Francisco. Picture taken January 2, 2013.

After the gates were closed, there was a private party, with speakers thanking those assembled.

The Exploratorium at The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco on its final day - picture 21, January 2, 2013. Photograph by Kevin Warnock.

Guests at private party after the closing of The Exploratorium on January 2, 2013 listen to remarks from various speakers over the public address system.

I set up my tripod outside the front door and posed for a self portrait to memorialize this memorable day.

Kevin Warnock, right, stands in front of The Exploratorium at The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco on its final day, January 2, 2013. Photograph taken via self timer.

Kevin Warnock, right, stands in front of The Exploratorium at The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco on its final day, January 2, 2013. Photograph taken via self timer.

On my way back to my car, which I parked many blocks away, I set up my tripod one last time to take this ‘magic hour’ photograph of The Palace of Fine Arts.

The Palace of Fine Arts shortly after sunset on January 2, 2013, the final day the Exploratorium was open to the public.

The Palace of Fine Arts shortly after sunset on January 2, 2013, the final day the Exploratorium was open to the public.

Note that the Exploratorium posted a sign at the entrance warning visitors that pictures and video would be captured by many people today, and that some of the material would be published.

I will miss this original location. It’s industrial and gritty and feels authentic. Outside by the adjoining Palace of Fine Arts, the location is truly beautiful. I fear that the new location will be too new, sparkly and flashy, and that the glitz will remove the charm that permeates the original.

Written by Kevin Warnock

January 2nd, 2013 at 10:00 pm

Intel CEO Paul Otellini is interviewed by Haas School of Business Dean Rich Lyons, October 3, 2012 at University of California Berkeley

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Intel CEO Paul Otellini at University of California Berkeley, October 3, 2012. Photograph by Kevin Warnock.

Intel CEO Paul Otellini at University of California Berkeley, October 3, 2012. Photograph by Kevin Warnock.

Yesterday afternoon, Wednesday, October 3, 2012, I attended the Dean’s Speaker Series at the Haas School of Business at the University of California Berkeley, in Berkeley, California USA.

Dean Richard Lyons interviewed Paul Otellini, the Chief Executive Officer of Intel Corporation. The question and answer session was held in the Anderson Auditorium, a venue I am very familiar with because it’s the same hall where the Berkeley Entrepreneurs Forum is usually held. I have attended the Forums for 20 years.

The interview was captured by a professional videographer, and the video will be soon made public on the Haas website page for the Speaker Series.

I have highlighted my favorite parts of Otellini’s remarks in my comments that follow.

Haas School of Business student asks Intel CEO Paul Otellini a question October 3, 2012 at University of California Berkeley

Haas School of Business student asks Intel CEO Paul Otellini a question October 3, 2012 at University of California Berkeley

Otellini completed his undergraduate studies at University of San Francisco, and received his Master of Business Administration from the Haas School of Business, though at the time it was named the Berkeley Business School. Otellini got a job at Intel in 1974 with his freshly minted MBA degree. Even though Otellini was a finance specialist, his first job at Intel was to program a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 minicomputer to perform cost analysis. This must have been an intense introduction to Intel for an MBA because mini-computers were not easy to program. I programmed a Digital Equipment Corporation VAX minicomputer in 1990, and it was difficult then, so I can only imagine how much more pesky and complicated it was to work 16 years earlier on the ancestor to the VAX.

Audience watches Rich Lyons interview Intel CEO Paul Otellini, October 3, 2012 at University of California Berkeley, in Berkeley, California USA

Audience watches Rich Lyons interview Intel CEO Paul Otellini, October 3, 2012 at University of California Berkeley, in Berkeley, California USA

When Otellini became CEO in 2005 he assessed that Intel was not organized correctly for where he saw the market heading. At the time, Intel had 105,000 employees. Otellini eliminated 25,000 jobs. The company is today back up to 103,000 employees. His advisers in 2005 were asking why he wanted to go into ‘the phone business’ when Intel was making money hand over fist at the time. Otelllini said he had many sleepless nights when he was contemplating letting 25,000 people go. He said he will never feel good about that, but he is grateful that he made the change well before the world financial collapse of 2008, so all the people let go were able to find jobs quickly.

Second year Haas student Michael Vladimer asks Intel CEO Paul Otellini a question, October 3, 2012 at University of California Berkeley. To the right of the student, seated: Jill Erbland and Andre Marquis.

Second year Haas student Michael Vladimer asks Intel CEO Paul Otellini a question, October 3, 2012 at University of California Berkeley. To the right of the student, seated: Jill Erbland and Andre Marquis.

I was surprised to learn that Intel is the world’s 4th largest software company in the world based on the number of computer programmers that it employs.

Otellini advised to get work experience in different geographic locations prior to starting a family.

Otellini said its chips are manufactured in three dimensions, which was forced upon it by the laws of physics, which prevented circuits from being made much smaller. To keep making more capable chips, transistors had to be stacked as well as placed side by side. This technology took Intel 10 years to perfect, with thousands of PhD holders working on the effort.

I wonder if they considered adding a ‘Now in 3D!’ tagline to their famous ‘Intel Inside’ stickers.

Audience watches Rich Lyons interview Intel CEO Paul Otellini, October 3, 2012 at University of California Berkeley

Audience watches Rich Lyons interview Intel CEO Paul Otellini, October 3, 2012 at University of California Berkeley

Otellini emphasized the high risks inherent in running Intel.

To illustrate, when Intel breaks ground on a new chip fabricating factory:

  • the technology hasn’t been developed yet
  • the products haven’t been designed yet
  • the markets for the products don’t exist yet

These factories take 3 1/2 years to build and cost USD $5,500,000,000 each, and Intel starts construction on two or three of these per year.

That sounds like a great definition of high risk to me.

Intel makes hardware reference designs that it provides to its customers so that they can get products to market more rapidly. Otellini said personal computer makers don’t spend that much on industrial design, so they like and need Intel to provide these turn key designs they can modify to make them unique.

Otellini had a mentor at Berkeley while he was a student in the early 1970s. That mentor worked at Bank of America, and tried to get Otellini to join that bank. Several years after Otellini had joined Intel, his mentor confided that Otellini had chosen the right company.

Haas School of Business Dean Rich Lyons and Intel CEO Paul Otellini, October 3, 2012 at UC Berkeley

Haas School of Business Dean Rich Lyons and Intel CEO Paul Otellini, October 3, 2012 at UC Berkeley

Intel has put in place a system where they can identify the source of so-called conflict minerals. They can also track them, and Otellini said that Intel is likely to be able to say by January 2013 that Intel has built the world’s first ‘conflict mineral free microprocessor’.

Otellini said he had spoken in the morning with Robert Hormats, Under Secretary for Economic, Energy and Agricultural Affairs at the Department of State, who he said is very interested in [removing] conflict minerals from products. The Department of State, according to Otellini, wants to make Intel’s conflict mineral tracking system a so-called ‘best known method’ for the [semiconductor] industry.

Otellini said it recycles the chemicals used in its plants, and plans to recycle the water it uses to such a complete degree that its factories will be able to reuse the water they consume over and over, without needing to return it to the underground aquifers, like they do today.

Audience member at Dean's Speaker Series with Paul Otellini at Haas School of Business, October 3, 2012.

Audience member at Dean's Speaker Series with Paul Otellini at Haas School of Business, October 3, 2012.

Otellini spoke about manufacturing competitiveness generally in the United States, something he is qualified to speak about because he advises United States President Barack Obama about competitiveness.

He said many of the motivating factors that have led to outsourcing are disappearing. He said that it costs more for Intel to hire 1st and 2nd level technical managers in China now than it does in Santa Clara, California USA. For engineers with 3 or 4 years of experience, the costs to hire them are now the same in the US as they are in China and India.

Otellini said that the United States could improve its position by lowering its corporate tax rate [to a level consistent with the rate in competitive economies]. He suggested the US streamline its permitting procedures for building new factories. He suggested that job training be improved to provide a skilled workforce to work in the new factories. He pointed out that currency and political risks are low in the US, and stated there is no risk of a company’s factory being expropriated by the US government. In other countries, governments sometimes do take over privately owned factories.

Paul Otellini speaks with Arthur Gensler at University of California Berkeley, October 3, 2012. Photograph by Kevin Warnock.

Paul Otellini speaks with Arthur Gensler at University of California Berkeley, October 3, 2012. Photograph by Kevin Warnock.

There were some famous guests in the audience.

Perhaps the most famous attendee was Arthur Gensler, the founder of M. Arthur Gensler Jr. & Associates, Inc. but commonly referred to as simply Gensler. I have been aware of this global architecture, planning, design and consulting firm since I was 23 years old at my first job out of college, at Newell Color Laboratory at 630 Third Street in San Francisco, California USA, since closed. Gensler was an important client. I suspect Gensler may be helping to design the new building Dean Lyons is being planned for the Haas School of Business campus.

Arthur Gensler speaking with Paul Otellini, October 3, 2012 at Haas School of Business at University of California Berkeley

Arthur Gensler speaking with Paul Otellini, October 3, 2012 at Haas School of Business at University of California Berkeley

After the interview, Lyons pointed out Mr. Gensler to me — without his helpful comment, I would not have been able to write this acknowledgment of his visit. Gensler is a big deal — they employ 3,500 people in 42 locations. They count all 10 of the Fortune 500 top 10 companies as clients.

Haas School of Business Dean Rich Lyons, left, watches Haas Professor Emeritus and Nobel Prize winner Oliver Williamson shake hands with Intel CEO Paul Otellini at Haas School of Business at University of California Berkeley, October 3, 2012. Photograph by Kevin Warnock.

Haas School of Business Dean Rich Lyons, left, watches Haas Professor Emeritus and Nobel Prize winner Oliver Williamson shake hands with Intel CEO Paul Otellini at Haas School of Business at University of California Berkeley, October 3, 2012. Photograph by Kevin Warnock.

Perhaps the second most famous attendee was Oliver Williamson. Williamson is Professor Emeritus at the Haas School of Business. In 2009 Williamson won the Nobel Prize for Economics. I saw Williamson speak in 2009 at the Haas Gala, the annual party the school throws each November. I blogged about that gala and wrote about Williamson, who spoke at the event. I took a picture of Williamson shaking hands with Otellini, shown here.

Intel CEO Paul Otellini with University of California Berkeley student Tammie Chen. Photograph by Kevin Warnock, October 3, 2012.

Intel CEO Paul Otellini with University of California Berkeley student Tammie Chen. Photograph by Kevin Warnock, October 3, 2012.

This last photograph of Mr. Otellini with Berkeley undergrad student Tammie Chen has an interesting story behind it.

I met Chen when she was an organizer for the 2011 Made for China Startup Pitch Competition. I was a judge for that competition. After that event, we became friends on Facebook, and she posted that she was going to be attending the Dean’s Speaker Series that is the subject of this blog post. I commented that I would be there as well, blogging. She asked me if I could take a picture of her with Otellini. I said I would. I walked up to him and asked him if I could introduce Chen to him and take a picture of him with her, and he readily agreed. They had a nice chat for a minute, and then they posed for this picture. Chen is a huge fan of Intel, and has visited their headquarters. She has a lot of friends that work at Intel.

I was surprised that no students approached Otellini to introduce themselves. This is the same behavior I saw at my first Dean’s Speaker Series event, in September 2012, when Lyons interviewed Randall Stephenson, the CEO of AT&T. There were students standing about 10 feet away from Otellini, in a large circle, but not a single student walked into the empty space to say hello. That made it easy for me to say hello to Mr. Otellini, who I have met and spoken with before, in 2008, at the Intel Capital CEO Summit [renamed the Intel Capital Global Summit] in San Francisco.

Haas School of Business Dean Rich Lyons and Intel CEO Paul Otellini, October 3, 2012 at University of California Berkeley. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

Haas School of Business Dean Rich Lyons and Intel CEO Paul Otellini, October 3, 2012 at University of California Berkeley. Photo by Kevin Warnock.

I like Intel. Their venture capital division Intel Capital was very nice to my company Silveroffice, Inc. by making it an Intel Capital Portfolio Company. Intel Capital invites me as their guest to Intel’s annual Intel Developer Forum, at which I get a new Intel Developer Forum branded laptop bag or backpack, which I use every time I leave my home with my Intel powered laptop. I hope to be appointed a judge for the Intel Global Challenge, a role I would be great at since I was a judge for the Berkeley Startup Competition for eight years through 2011. My application is pending, so please wish me luck! I love judging startup competitions, and so far I have judged four different competitions at University of California Berkeley.

I took all the photographs in this post. I used a Canon 5D Mark II camera with a Canon 80-200mm f:2.8 L zoom lens. Click on the images twice in delayed succession to see the images at full size. I uploaded the images at their full 21 megapixel resolution, at a JPG quality of 12. The light level was comparatively low, so I shot at ISO 2,500, without flash.

Thank you to Meg Fellner of the Dean’s Office for getting me a ticket to this sold out event.

Photographs of Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012, San Francisco, California USA

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Observe the octopus on this woman at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Yesterday afternoon, Sunday, September 23, 2012, I attended the famous Folsom Street Fair in San Francisco, California USA.

The Folsom Street Fair is a BDSM and leather subculture street fair.

The organizer, Folsom Street Events, has a page on Facebook. There is a lengthy article on WikiPediA about the Folsom Street Fair — the largest fair of its type in the world.

This post contains photographs that might be rated PG-13 if this were a Hollywood movie. All nipples are covered in this post, but in some cases just barely, with pasties or adhesive tape. Please skip this post if you are squeamish about nudity or sexuality.

If, however, you want to see more outlandish photographs taken by other photographers, they may be found on Yahoo’s Flickr website. The Flickr pictures are by The Golden Gate Express newspaper.

Beautiful woman at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Woman about to be flogged by the man on the left, at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

I took the pictures you see on this page with my Canon 5D Mark II. I used a Canon 50mm macro lens for some of the pictures, and a Canon 70-200 F:2.8 L zoom lens for the rest. Click on the pictures twice in delayed succession to see the images at full size. I uploaded the pictures at maximum resolution and maximum JPG quality of 12.

San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012. Photo of woman having her body painted.

I have attended the Folsom Street Fair three times in my life — yesterday, in 2010, and in the 1990s.

I am not into BDSM or the leather subculture, but I enjoy the fair.

Yesterday was the first time I went alone, and the first time I brought a good camera with me. I was nervous about being a guy with a camera taking a lot of pictures, but there was no need to be. There were thousands of cameras there. I doubt anyone arrived without a camera. In so many instances, the subjects you see here were actively posing for photographers. Some groups had a dozen photographers at a time trying to photograph them.

San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012. Group dancing in the Sun.

There was a lot of full nudity at the fair, especially among the men. I estimate there were 200 completely nude men walking around. I only saw one completely nude woman walking around. There were dozens of topless women walking around, without pasties or tape over their nipples.

Woman poses for the camera at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

I am straight, so I focused more of my energies towards photographing the many attractive women in attendance. I photographed some men too to capture the ambiance of the event and out of fairness.

San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012. Man lifting a man off the ground.

I gave my card to some of my subjects, and to my amazement, fully half the people I gave my card to emailed me and asked me to send them a copy of the picture I took of them. I happily obliged. Next time I go to the fair, I will offer my card to everyone I photograph, instead of waiting to be asked for it like I did yesterday. One of the women I photographed is a model, and I asked her if she would like to do a shoot with me, and she wrote back that yes, she would. For any of the other women that I have included in this post, I would like to schedule a photo shoot with you as well. You may contact me via Facebook. While you’re there, consider subscribing to my public posts.

C. Amina Peterson at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

I publish a photography blog in addition to this blog at KevinWarnock.com. I only publish results from my photo shoots to my photography blog, not candid images of strangers like you see here.

Man poses for the camera at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

You may see my photography portfolio at the site ModelMayhem. Model Mayhem is like Facebook for models, photographers and related artists.

Naked man wearing a US President Barack Obama mask helps the President collect votes at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

The craziest thing I saw at the Folsom Street Fair this year was a nude African American man wearing a rubber Barack Obama mask and holding an Obama/Biden campaign poster. He stood in the same location for hours, allowing himself to be photographed by hundreds of people. Barack Obama is the current President of the United States of America, and he is running for reelection in November, 2012, later this year.

Band performs on stage at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012. Woman in sun glasses.

Woman uses her Apple iPhone at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Sign over booth for Freedominchrist-sf.org at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Woman with flowing blue hair at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Woman with backlit red hair at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Woman with a beautiful smile at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Woman with jet black hair at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Woman in profile at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Man with horns on his hat at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Two women pose for the camera at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Two women and a man pose for the camera at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Woman with hula hoop at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

A couple walks together in the Sun at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Woman with amazing ear rings poses for the camera at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Woman with large yellow glasses at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Three women pose for the camera at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

A beautiful tall woman at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

A group of men talking at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Two woman paddle a man at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

A group of women talk at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Woman with purple hair at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

 

Woman dancing at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Performers on the stage at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Woman with bloody teeth at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Man poses for the camera at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012. Photo of person in Fox costume.

Woman wearing pasties at the San Francisco Folsom Street Fair, September 23, 2012.

Written by Kevin Warnock

September 24th, 2012 at 11:00 pm